Event: Doctor Who Favourite Regenerates At Spaceport!

On Sunday 3rd August, Spaceport will be welcoming a brand new Doctor Who exhibit to the Time Travellers exhibition. A lifelike sculpture of The Fourth Doctor and Liverpool native, Tom Baker has been skilfully created by Phil Robinson and will be carefully installed by Phil this weekend. 

Tom Baker played the iconic role of The Doctor from 1974 to 1981 and remains a firm favourite of Whovians to this day. The Tom Baker sculpture joins life-sized replica Daleks, Cyberman, K9 and many others alongside memorabilia ranging from the 1970’s to the present day. With the Robots exhibition also at Spaceport including Wall-E, Terminator, Futurama’s Bender Westworld Robot Gunfighter Yul Brynner so there’s something to enthral every sci-fi fan in the family. 

Intrepid space explorers can also enjoy unlimited simulator rides & take a virtual journey through space in the 360 degree space dome theatre, venture through the themed galleries, interactive hands-on exhibits and exciting audio visual experiences then if you’re feeling peckish refuel at the cafe and play area at Seacombe terminal. Make a day of it with a trip on the iconic Mersey Ferry, with great value family prices** combination tickets available for River Explorer cruise and Spaceport.

**Adult Combination Ticket: £13, Child Combination Ticket: £7.50, Family Combination Ticket: £33.50, Concession Combination Ticket: £11 (Concession tickets are available for seniors aged 60 and over and students - valid NUS card required). 

[Source: Spaceport] 

Moffat Talks Capaldi Costume

Current showrunner Steven Moffat has been chatting exclusively to SFX about Doctor Who and the outfit for Peter Capaldi's Doctor. Read what he has to say below.

“He wanted to be quite stark,” Moffat reveals. “Stark and skinny. A stick-insect sort of thing. Clara actually calls him a grey-haired stick-insect at one point. We had some hilarious pictures of Peter just dressing up. It was all coming from him because he’s really into his clothes. I didn’t feel qualified to go and chat too much about it. Certainly the costume didn’t go anywhere until I shut up. The thing I’ve learned about showrunning is you need to know the bits you’re bad at!

“I’ve got certain things that I’ll say – I don’t want anything in that costume that I have to write into the script. I don’t want people saying ‘But why are you dressed as a circus clown?’ I want him to walk into a pub, a restaurant, a space conference, an army base and nobody stares at him.

“There was an issue simply because it’s quite dark as a costume and it’s a show that largely takes place in a tunnel. I kept saying ‘We are going to be able to see him, aren’t we?’ I suppose the red lining helps, when the flaps are open.

“I think there’s always something a little bit formal about The Doctor. Oddly enough in this series, for whatever reason, he seems to be wearing different outfits far more often than The Doctor normally does. He’s got his basic outfit but he’s in a spacesuit in one of them, and he’s a caretaker in another one and then he’s all dressed up in a later episode. He does vary it a bit.  And he mixes up the basic costume, hugely. We’ve tended to see  the white shirt version in public but actually the one I like best is when he wears the jumper under his coat. I think he looks like a submarine commander, like an old sailor or something. It makes him all rugged and handsome!”


Read more from Steven Moffat in the new issue of SFX, on sale now with a choice of five exclusive collectable Doctor Who covers.


Capaldi gets EW cover!

The latest issue of the US magazine Entertainment Weekly, out Friday, has a very special Peter Capaldi cover and feature inside. Check out the deets below and click on the image included for a bigger version.

Does this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly defy the laws of physics by being bigger on the inside than it would appear from looking at its exterior? Fans of the British science fiction show Doctor Who may well think so. For this week’s cover story, senior writer Clark Collis travels to the UK to meet with Peter Capaldi, the new star of the now 51-year-old time travel saga, and to find out what fans can expect from the forthcoming season of Doctor Who, which premieres on Aug 23.

“He’s more alien than we’ve seen him for a while,”
says the actor, speaking about his version of the eccentric Time Lord.
“He is less patient with the foibles of human beings.”

Thankfully, the whole Who team were patient with EW‘s probing about the new, hush-hush season. In addition to Capaldi, Collis also spoke with the actor’s costar Jenna Coleman and showrunner Steven Moffat who tackled such burning as questions as “Will Capaldi’s previous appearances in the Who universe be referenced this season?” and “What will happen in the two-part finale?” Collis even got to drive the Doctor’s bigger-on-the-inside time- and space-ship the TARDIS and did so without busting anything which, according to production designer Michael Pickwoad, makes him a more careful temporal navigator than previous Who star Matt Smith (“He was very good at breaking things”). We also persuade Capaldi to talk about the old monsters he’d like his Doctor to face and offer a sartorial breakdown of the Time Lord’s many looks through the show’s half-century history. Never seen Doctor Who (and feel a bid daunted by that history)? Then feel free to peruse our guide to how you can get into Who.

For more on Doctor Who, pick up a copy of this week’s Entertainment Weekly, on stands Friday.

Tom Baker, best selling Doctor on ebay

With less than a month until the début of the twelfth Doctor, online marketplace ebay has compiled a list of the top ten Doctors by merchandise sales on the site.

Top of the list is Doctor number four, Tom Baker, whose seven year tenure in the role created enough memorabilia to outsell the other Doctors by 203%.

The most recent Doctors, David Tennant and Matt Smith fall into second and third place, while Peter Capaldi, who has so far only had a minute on screen, comes in an number 10.

For collectors, Sylvester McCoy – the seventh Doctor – is the most lucrative, yielding the greatest individual return. Items related to his brief stint sell with the highest value, with prices for his figurine peaking at £565.

Top 10 Doctors by sales
  1. Tom Baker
  2. David Tennant
  3. Matt Smith
  4. William Hartnell
  5. Paul McGann
  6. Patrick Troughton
  7. Sylvester McCoy
  8. Colin Baker
  9. Peter Davison
  10. Peter Capaldi
eBay Spokesperson, Laura Wilkinson-Rea says,
It really speaks to Tom Baker’s iconic Doctor Who status that he continues to outsell the other Doctors. It also seems like the Universe is safe for now as the Doctors are far outselling the baddies. For example, eBay.co.uk currently lists 200,000 items of Doctor Who merchandise - totally dwarfing the Dalek’s 14,000. We’d be fascinated to see what spin Malcolm Tucker would put on this!

Win a goodie bag with Doctor Who Adventures

Get a photograph of yourself reading Doctor Who Adventures in an unusual place this summer and you could win a Doctor Who goodie bag.

That's the competition being run by the fortnightly magazine in the new edition out today.

Editor Moray Laing said:
Whether visiting friends or relatives next door, heading off to a beach - or even popping off to an alien planet or a different time zone, we want to see pictures of readers reading the latest issue in unusual places. We'll print the best and funniest pictures in a future issue - and our favourite photograph will win a prize!
Full details in the magazine.

Also in issue 351, the Eleventh Doctor appears in the comic strip for a final adventure, written by former script editor Andrew Cartmel, plus:
  • The latest news
  • Top tips for being the Doctor's companion
  • A guide to the Eleventh Doctor's stories
  • Top 10 TARDIS trips
  • Dalek secrets about the Dalek Emperor
  • Strax's guide to the Cybermen
  • A look at filming of the latest series
  • Puzzles and posters
Issue 351 of DWA, which comes with a TARDIS key ring, notepad, stickers and a sonic pen, is available until Tuesday 12th August.

The 50 Year Diary – Day 575 – The Keeper of Traken, Episode Three

Will Brooks’ 50 Year Diary - watching Doctor Who one episode a day from the very start... 

Day 575: The Keeper of Traken, Episode Three

Dear diary,

I’m so used to thinking of this story as the first part of a ‘Master trilogy’, that it’s easy to forget that he doesn’t actually show up until this point in the story! We’ve heard his voice right the way though, and there’s been hands flicking switches for a while, but it’s not until the end of this episode that he finally swings around to reveal himself to the audience (and I can’t help thinking that he has the look of an excited puppy in doing so!), and announce his true identity - even if the Doctor doesn’t know it yet.

My wonder is, though... did this have impact when it first went out? The Master here is only a slightly modified version of the one seen in The Deadly Assassin (am I right in thinking that one story goes that they found the cloak from that story in the skip just as they were preparing for this one, and salvaged it in time?), but that last appearance was ages ago. That story went out around October/November 1976, whereas The Keeper of Traken didn’t make it to screen until early 1981! You’re looking just over four years between appearances, and a lot has changed in the programme since then! Graham Williams has come and gone, as have Leela, Romana, and K9... did the audience at the time sit up in their chairs here thinking ‘bloody hell, it’s the Master!?!?’ or was it just an excited puppy in a tatty, skip-bound cloak?

Oh, I’m just nit-picking really, because it is a very good cliffhanger when you’re watching through in order like this. The mysterious bad guy who has been wreaking all this havoc on Traken and causing problems for the Doctor is none other than the Master! And he finally reveals himself to us just as Kassia takes the seat of the Keeper, and is instantly replaced with the Melkur sitting on the throne! It really is a very striking way to end the episode, and the fact that the Doctor has felt more hopeless in this story than many others makes it feel like the Master is a very real threat to him again.

I’m a little puzzled by exactly what this ‘Source’ is that he’s gained control of, mind. As far as I can tell (bear with me): it’s the power source for the Keeper. A kind of technology that needs to be guided by a living mind (the Keeper), and has the ability to keep everything in check throughout the Traken Union (is this a series of planets? That’s how I understand it, though it could simply be a number of countries on the one world of Traken). Being connected to the Source grants the Keeper an unusually long life, because... well... because it does. Hence, when a Keeper dies, they’re unable to hold back forces of chaos any longer, and thus storms begin to brew etc etc. In some ways, it’s the struggle between the Black and the White Guardian in miniature. If I’ve got that right, then it’s a great target for the Master, and fairly reminiscent of his plan in The Deadly Assassin, without all that boring Time Lord Stuff.

I think what’s throwing me is the mashing of a fairy tale world, all groves and stone corridors, with people dressed in crushed velvet, and the world of science fiction, with lots of machinery and intelligent creations like the Source itself. It’s throwing me even more that they can create technology as powerful as this seems to be, but not an adequate way of mankind the transition more stable between two Keepers. I know Nyssa goes on to have an ability with science once she’s a regular member of the TARDIS crew, and I’m wondering if it may feel less of a clash once she’s away from the trappings of her home world?